Best Chicken Marsala Linguine Recipe and Origins – Dagostino Pasta

Chicken Marsala Linguine

Chicken Marsala is an Italian-American dish of golden pan-fried chicken and mushrooms in a rich Marsala wine sauce. It is a classic restaurant dish, it’s really easy to make at home. With just one pan, you can have it on the dinner table in 45 minutes.

45 Min | Serves 6


Fun Fact

Where does Chicken Marsala Originate? Is it French or Italian... or both?  Marsala as a sauce IS a French technique from the reduction to the mushrooms.  In Sicily, it was a status symbol to have a chef that was French trained, known as "Monzu", or Monsieur, these French chefs would cook French food for the Sicilians and Marsala was the dish they would make if they made it big.


Ingredients

1 pkg Dagostino Linguine

1/4 cup Dagostino Extra Virgin Olive Oil

4 skinless, boneless, chicken breast

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

3/4 cup of onions, chopped

2 tbsp garlic, chopped

 1 lb crimini or porcini mushrooms, 

stemmed and sliced

1/2 cup sweet Marsala wine

1 cup Mascarpone cheese

2 tbsp Dijon mustard

5 tbsp butter

1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley


Directions

  1. Season chicken with salt and pepper.  Heat olive oil in a heavy large skillet over high heat.  Add chicken and cook just until brown, about 4 minutes per side.  Transfer chicken to a plate and cool slightly.  Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.
  2. While the chicken cools, melt 2 tablespoons butter in the same skillet over medium-high heat, then add onion and sauté until tender, about 2 minutes. 
  3. Add mushrooms and garlic and sauté until the mushrooms are tender and the juices evaporate, about 12 minutes. 
  4. Add marsala wine and simmer until it is reduced by half, about 4 minutes. 
  5. Stir in mascarpone and dijon mustard
  6. Cut chicken breasts crosswise into 1/3 inch thick slices. 
  7. Add chicken and any accumulated juices back to the skillet.  Simmer uncovered over medium-low heat until the chicken is just cooked through and the sauce thickens slightly, about 2 minutes. 
  8. Stir in chopped parsley.  Season the sauce to taste with salt and pepper.
  9. Add linguine to the pot of water and cook until al dente, stirring occasionally, about 6 minutes.  Drain.  Toss pasta with 3 tablespoons butter and season to taste with salt and pepper.  

Place pasta on serving plates.  Spoon chicken mixture over the pasta.  Garnish with parsley sprigs, if desired, and serve.

Buon Appetito!


About Dagostino Handmade Pasta

From Lemons to Premium Pasta

Our story started with lemon farmers in Sicily. In the early 19th century lemons would go on long voyages from Sicily to New Orleans, usually taking around 100 days. These Sicilians would create settlements in New Orleans and with them came pasta.

The Fresina Family, our founders, were some of these original lemon farmers and started creating handmade pasta in New Orleans in 1926. Since then, the D’Agostino and Hayward families have continued their tradition of creating premium handmade pasta using pure semolina flour and water then cutting the pasta through bronze dies and air-drying in wooden cellars.

Our pasta is still made the old-fashioned way, in our Baton Rouge pasta factory, using the “delicate” method developed centuries ago. Small quantities of pasta are extruded through bronze, carefully looped over wooden rods, straightened, and then air-dried in wooden cellars. Celebrated for its delicate texture and classic flavor, our pasta is handmade, all-natural, and preservative free, producing the best tasting pasta available on the market today.

Our sauces are some of the most authentic sauces available outside of Italy. The sauces are handmade in small batches with a unique blend of fresh herbs and spices. Made without preservatives, each batch is carefully examined by our chefs and food scientists to ensure our sauces are the best tasting on the market.

You will experience our time honored family treasure in every meal.

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